Manufacturer: Nintendo
Released: 1983
Designer: Shigeru Miyamoto
Added to my collection: October, 2003 (initial cabinet purchase)

Sold: October 31, 2015

Description
My Machine
Technical
Links

Description:

Mario Bros. screen shotTo be perfectly honest, there was only one classic Nintendo arcade game I was ever fanatical about back in the day, and Mario Bros. was it. I don't know what it is that makes this game so compelling--far more so than Donkey Kong, in my opinion--but this is definitely one of my personal favorites.

By the time Nintendo released this game, Mario had his official name, a brother named Luigi, and a new profession. He was a carpenter back when he was battling the big monkey, but in Mario Bros. he's a plumber. Good thing, too--the pipes are full of nasty turtles, crabs, and flying things, and it's up to Mario and Luigi to clean them out. This game was one of the best cooperative two player classic arcade games (right up there with Wizard of Wor and Joust), and it's definitely the most fun when played in two-player mode. The object of the game is to flip the offending pipe-dwelling creatures onto their backs (by jumping against the floor under their feet) and then kick them off the platform. Simple, but really, really, fun.

Back to the top.


My Machine

Before and AfterLike my Donkey Kong machine, Mario Bros. is a fixer-upper began its life (at least it's life under my care) as something else. In this case, it was a Super Mario Bros. machine in a Nintendo VS. cabinet that I acquired from Cassidy Nolen, a friend I met last year at the Classic Gaming Expo (CGE) in Las Vegas. Cassidy repairs and sells arcade machines and home console systems. (Visit Cassidy's site, AtariOnline. If you're looking for classic game collectibles, he might be able to hook you up!) Cassidy had an old Super Mario Bros. sitting out in his pool shed, and sold it to me for $25 just to get it out of the way. It needed some monitor work, but was otherwise solid and functional. That the board works didn't much matter to me, though, because I had other plans for the game from the get-go.

The cosmetic transformation from Super to non-Super Mario Bros. is mostly complete at this point, although the control panel overlay needs replacing eventually. I have acquired a Mario Bros. board, but I have yet to have the monitor repaired. I also need to acquire a wiring harness adapter. I didn't know that the newer (post-1983) Nintendo games use a different set of connectors than the classic games like Mario Bros.

Check out my restoration log for a complete account of the entire conversion and restoration process.

Back to the top.


Mario Bros. Technical Info:

DIP switch settings:

Mario Bros. has two banks of DIP switches, but only the second bank (an 8-switch bank) is used. The asterisks (*) indicate the factory default settings. (Note that the factory defaults are to the best of my knowledge--the manual doesn't indicate the default settings for this board.)

DIP Bank 2 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
Lives 3 *
off
off
4
on
off
5
off
on
6
on
on
Coinage 2 coins/1 credit
on
off
1 coin/1 credit *
off
off
1 coin/2 credits
off
on
1 coin/3 credits
on
on
Bonus Life 20,000 *
off
off
 
30,000
on
off
 
40,000
off
on
 
None
on
on
 
Difficulty Easy *
off
off
Medium
off
on
Hard
on
off
Hardest
on
on

Back to the top.

More Mario Bros. Info:

Back to the top.